Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association

Ecological food security in the Western Indian Ocean region through sustainable fish recruitment

Project Objectives

1) Identify habitat conditions critical for fish recruitment and key drivers for fish larvae production.
2) Identify dispersal potential of fish larvae from the seagrass habitats where adult fish spawn.
3) Use this information to predict future economic impacts and the most vulnerable coastal areas.
4) Provide scientific information that can lead to improved management and protection strategies in coastal East Africa.

Methodology
Expected Results

1. Improved Food security (fish) from improved habitat management,
2. Improved community capacity knowledge for conservation and monitoring,
3. Increased understanding of fish larval production in seagrass beds by community and stakeholders,
4. Enhanced and management and policy guidelines on seagrass degradation,
5. Enhanced partnership between Kenya, Tanzania and Swedish researchers established. The partnerships may seek funding for long-term collaborations in the future or have exchange visits for laboratory experiences
6. Incorporation of new knowledge in the implementation of Government fisheries policies of Tanzania and County Integrated Development Programmes (CIDP) of coastal counties of Kenya

Basic Facts
Project Partners:

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute- Kenya
University of Dar es Salaam-Institute of Marine Science-Tanzania
Stockholm University-Sweden

Lead Institution: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI)
Year of Approval: 2018
Project Country: Kenya and Tanzania
Investigators: James Mwaluma, Margareth Kyewalyanga, Paul Onyango, and Jacob Ochiewo
Study Sites:
Project Activities:

The project is investigating how food-provisioning services in the form of fish larvae production are threatened by coastal habitat degradation and how production of this natural resource is related to climate change and coastal development in Coastal East Africa (CEA). In addition, the project will identify sensitive seagrass habitats that need protection and threshold values for healthy productive seagrass habitats at the same time estimate the socio-economic costs of seagrass beds loss to fisheries. Moreover, the project will identify dispersal potential of fish larvae from the seagrass habitats to where adult fish spawn, prediction of future economic impacts and the most vulnerable coastal areas including provision of scientific information that can lead to improved management and protection strategies in CEA.

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Students:
Students Supported by the Project and Titles of their Projects
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